Festival of Archaeology: Talk

The Magic and Myth of Watermeadows | Dr Kathy Stearne

25 July 2022, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

The origins of water meadows are lost in medieval times. Surface water irrigation expanded in Wessex and throughout England from the sixteenth century and was a sustainable intensive integrated agricultural system until the twentieth century. This talk looks at the origins of water meadows in England, their management and importance to agriculture through the centuries, and why they are still important in terms of landscape history and ecology today.

 

  • Opening hours:

    Daily: 9.00am - 4.30pm
    Sunday: 10.00am - 4.00pm
    Bank Holidays: 10.00am - 4.00pm

  • Dorset Museum

    High West Street
    Dorchester DT1 1XA

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Dr Kathy Stearne

Dr Kathy Stearn has conducted 30 years of water meadows research.  Growing up in the Yorkshire Dales, Kathy has a love for the countryside and history.  She has worked in agriculture and conservation since 1980.  Kathy gained a Doctorate in Agricultural History and Ecological Management from Imperial College London in 2004.  She presently runs a consultancy for landowners and farmers, advising on conservation, ecology and hydrology.  She has many years of experience as a successful lecturer and mentor and is currently working with Reading University mentoring undergraduate Students. Kathy has a passion for travel and is a resident historian on Viking Ocean Cruises, recently cruising around Norway and the Mediterranean.


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Home of Hillforts & Henges is an exciting new event from 21st to 31st July that will celebrate Dorchester’s neolithic and iron age landscape, rich in earthworks and the people that have lived here for over 6,000 years.

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Co-ordinated by the Council for British Archaeology, the Festival offers hundreds of events nationwide, organised by museums, heritage organisations, national and country parks, universities, local societies, and community archaeologists.

The Festival of Archaeology will take place between 16 – 31 July 2022.

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Festival of Archaeology: Talk

21 July 2022, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

The Ridgeway Vikings: New research and findings | Heather Tamminen

Using modern digital technology, the sharp force of trauma on these individuals has been reappraised to see what new information can be learned. Bournemouth University’s Heather Tamminen will show how this technology has been able to refine the interpretations of the events that occurred and have added to the narrative of dramatic events that took place on the Ridgeway ten centuries ago.

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Festival of Archaeology: Talk

22 July 2022, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

The Extraordinary Prehistoric Landscape Under Your Feet And Up The Hills | Steve Wallis

In this talk Steve Wallis is to explore the prehistoric landscape of the Dorchester area, covering the changes over time and the different types of monuments and remains.

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Festival of Archaeology: Talk

25 July 2022, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

The Magic and Myth of Watermeadows | Dr Kathy Stearne

The origins of water meadows are lost in medieval times. Surface water irrigation expanded in Wessex and throughout England from the sixteenth century and was a sustainable intensive integrated agricultural system until the twentieth century. This talk looks at the origins of water meadows in England.

Find out more

Festival of Archaeology: Talk

26 July 2022, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

The Durotriges Project | Paul Cheetham

Of all the Iron Age tribes identified from pre-Roman Britain, the Durotriges are the most culturally distinct. Roughly occupying an area that equates with modern Dorset, together with significant parts of southern Wiltshire and south-eastern Somerset, the pottery, coinage, settlements and burial practices of the Durotriges clearly marks them out from their contemporary tribal neighbours the Atrebates, Belgae, Dumnonii and Dobunni.

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Festival of Archaeology: Talk

27 July 2022, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

VIP Archaeology: From the Neolithic to the Medieval, the archaeology of the Dorset Visual Impact Provision | John Boothroyd

Working on behalf of National Grid on its Dorset Visual Impact Provision (VIP) just outside Dorchester, a team of more than 25 archaeologists spent almost two years excavating and recording a wealth of evidence for human activity dating back 6000 years.

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Festival of Archaeology: Talk

28 July 2022, 7:00pm

‘Anciently a manor’: the medieval manor at Lower Putton Lane, Chickerell | Dr Clare Randall

Join Dr Clare Randall to find out more about the findings from excavations at Lower Putton Lane carried out by Context One Heritage and Archaeology during 2016–2017 revealed a significant part of a manorial settlement.

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Festival of Archaeology: Talk

29 July 2022, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Hidden Patterns in the South Dorset Landscape | Jonathan Harwood

The positions of churches in the South Dorset Landscape, when connected together by straight lines reveal deliberate and meaningful patterns. 

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Special Exhibition

28 May – 30 October 2022

Take a fresh look at the Victorian novelist and poet, Thomas Hardy, in the stunning Wessex landscapes that shaped his view of the world. His story will be retold in exciting new ways by our museum collections, from period costumes to personal letters, art to archaeology.

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FULLY BOOKED

17 June - 11 July 2022, 10:00am - 1:00pm

Hardy’s Wessex: Drawing on the ancient past

This six-week course led by artist Helen Garrett will take you on a creative journey through Thomas Hardy’s work, inspirations and Dorset Museum’s collections.

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