DNHAS Proceedings

The Proceedings has been presenting fascinating scholarly articles annually for over 140 years.

It covers a wide variety of Dorset-related subjects of interest to our members. This ranges from geology, ecology and other natural sciences, to art, literature, social history and archaeology.

A copy of the Proceedings is included in the membership of the Society each year.

The journal is fully peer-reviewed, and we are always interested in submissions on the entire range of subjects.

For guidance and submissions, forms are available for download below. If you would like to discuss a potential paper, please contact the Editor.

Want to write for us?

Notes for Contributors

The Proceedings and Monograph series welcome contributions.

Submission Checklist

All Proceedings contributions should be submitted to the Society Editor and must be accompanied by the Submission.

Proposal

If you have a proposal for an article or other publication and would like further advice, please contact the Editor.

Out Now

Highlights of the most recent edition of the Proceedings of the Dorset Natural History and Archaeology Society Vol: 141. (2020)

  • The Dorset Rotulus: A Newly discovered source of English Polyphonic music, by Margaret Bent.
  • New Insights on the enigmatic Sphenodonian jaw from Dorset, by Jorge Herrera-Flores.
  • The Seatown burnt mound, Chideock, by Martin Papworth.
  • Structure and Change in Bronze Age burial mounds: An antiquarian excavation re-examined using an integrated geophysical and topographical survey at Clandon Barrow, Dorset, by John Gale, Paul Cheetham and Harry Manley.

In the footsteps of Vespasian: Re-thinking the Roman legionary fortress at Lake Farm, Wimborne Minster, by Miles Russell, Paul Cheetham, Dave Stewart, and David John.

Available on request from the Museum Shop | £20.00

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Membership

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Become a member of the Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society today and get a deeper insight into 250 million years of Dorset’s history, while you help protect its rich heritage for future generations.